Syria’s multi-party conflict and multi-way war

[this is a translation of the original Arabic that will shortly appear in therepublicgs.net]

Shiar Youssef *

Four years after the start of the Syrian revolution, much of the dominant analysis and commentary on the revolution and the subsequent war remains dominated by simplistic, dualistic world views and equally simplistic and dualistic policies and proposals. This article is an attempt to analyse the Syrian revolution as a multi-party conflict of interests and values, and the war in Syria as a multi-way war. Read the rest of this entry

Call for a first Mediterranean anarchist meeting by FA, IFA and Le Commun libertaire

Tunisia, March 2015

Today, the Mediterranean region continues to be one of the regions in the world beset by popular uprisings and protests. These range from north to south of the Mediterranean, following the global economic and financial crisis, causing an increase in insecurity and poverty and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people.

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PALESTINE: Take Action: Free Lina Khattab, imprisoned student and folkloric dancer

free-lina-700x357

[Tahrir-ICN note: Lina’s next court hearing scheduled for 18 January]

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SYRIA: #Douma4 Relaunched

#Douma4 Relaunchedimages
 
Put Pressure on Zahran Alloush @zahran1970
 
Join us on 9th of December
 
 
In few days, specifically on the 9th of December, the day that commemorates the first anniversary of our friends and comrades abduction; Nazem Hammadi, Wael Hammadeh, Samira Khalil and Razan Zeitounah’s by “unknown” armed groups in Douma. 
 
Their whereabouts are still unknown and no credible information about their safety and heath came to light uptill now.

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PALESTINE: The war is not over

gaza-2014By Mariam Barghouti

As you walk in the streets of Ramallah, with its aesthetically appealing buildings and the chaos of shoppers and street vendors the silence here is deafening.

We continue to protract this bubble deeper into the echelons of denial and complacency. The ululations in the summer for Gaza, and the metamorphosis into a population of cheerleaders continues to etch its indentation. We offered blistered tongues and Gaza offered its soul. Read the rest of this entry

MOROCCO: An Epiphany in Imider: the true history, how it began, how it has been ignored

22.11.2014  by By Abdellatif Talibi

940859_650158655001201_939816504_nImider is located between Tinghir and Boumalne Dades in the south-east of Morocco. It’s a small village with rustic charm. Those who dwell there are marked by their simplicity and hospitality. “Tamazgha” is the word for land inhabited by residents who speak Tamazight, commonly known in the west as “Berber.” It is a dry, remote region in the mountains, still maintaining traditional religious values and not yet tarnished by massive globalization. What is more striking is that if you read about the popular understanding of Imider, one is surprised to find out that people know the area as one of the most famous silver mines in North Africa and the 7th largest in the world. Major profits are generated by it on a daily basis. However, a certain irony lies in the fact that these same people were ignored, despite the life that they had been living there long before the mine — human beings who suffer daily because of that mine. The great majority ignores both the mine and residents primarily because the owners are reluctant to make the the commercial affair a widely-known fact. They want it remain under cover permanently, and for that very reason, have kept the media from discovering the facts. It’s been nearly three years of discomfort and struggles that the Imidri people have endured through their peaceful sit-in. They are condemned to all forms of humiliation in their ‘occupied land.’ They are, roughly speaking, subject to acts of ‘looting’ and dramatic disruptions in their daily lives. All these impositions can be attributed to human cupidity to possess. It is, simply speaking, pure greed.

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PALESTINE: Sexual Violence, Women`s Bodies, and Israeli Settler Colonialism

Nov 17 2014 by Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Sarah Ihmoud and Suhad Dahir-Nashif

[ [“Deaths.” Drawing by Suhad Daher-Nashif]

They not only invaded our home, took over our space, and evicted us—they even arrested me and took me to the Maskubya—the police station.  I was put in room number four, alone, for a long time.  Then, a big and tall man, a police officer, entered the interrogation room.  I was alone, and started shivering from fear as he closed the door, started moving things around in the room and examining me from head to toe.  I was terrorized, and my heart was beating so fast.  His eyes penetrated my body, as he was opening the drawers looking for something.  Then, he left the room and came back five minutes later holding a box.  He pulled out a pair of blue plastic gloves, and put one on each of his hands, while looking at me and saying “…Come here…” I must tell you that I was terrorized when they invaded the house and evicted us. I was extremely anxious when they arrested my son. But my fears of ‘you know what’…You know…being abused…being raped by his blue big hands and more…were the most terrifying moments of my life.[1]

These were the words of Sama, a thirty-six-year-old Palestinian woman who lost the intimate familial and physical space of her home, only to experience further terror with the threat of sexual abuse.  Sama’s narrative is not uncommon, as colonized women living under severe deprivation and dispossession are subject to daily attacks against their sexuality and bodily rights. Sexual violence is central to the larger structure of colonial power, its racialized machinery of domination, and its logic of elimination.  This is readily apparent in the history of settler colonial contexts, where the machinery of violence explicitly targets native women’s sexuality and bodily safety as biologized “internal enemies” since they are the producers of the next generation. Read the rest of this entry

Interview with the Kurdistan Anarchists Forum (KAF) about the situation in Iraq/Kurdistan

e8d77bd211a1002cfec789808c0daf20This interview was carried out by http://www.alasbarricadas.org on 3rd September 2014. The English translation has been edited for readability by Anarkismo.net.

ALB: How are you now ?

We are fine but like many of you extremely concerned about the current situation in Iraq in general and the Iraqi part of Kurdistan in particular. We are very active in the social media with respect to writing, making comments and discussing the current crisis that exists with different people and groups.

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The struggle for Kobane: an example of selective solidarity

By Leila Al Shami

comrades from DAF join the struggle to defend Kobane

comrades from DAF join the struggle to defend Kobane

The heroic resistance of the people of Kobane in fighting the onslaught of the Daesh (ISIS) fascists since mid-September, has led to a surge of international solidarity. A multitude of articles and statements have been written and protests have been held in cities across the world. Kurds have flooded across the Turkish border to help their compatriots in the fight despite being brutally pushed back by Turkish forces, and others including Turkish comrades from DAF (Revolutionary Anarchist Action) have gone to the border to support in keeping it open to help the flood of refugees escaping to Turkey. There have been calls to arm Kurdish forces and calls to support DAF and send aid for refugees.  Yet this solidarity with Syria’s Kurds has not been extended to non-Kurdish groups in the country that have been fighting, and dying, to rid themselves of fascism and violent repression and for freedom and self-determination. It’s often said incorrectly, that sectarianism lies at the heart of the Syrian conflict. It’s necessary to understand to what extent sectarianism plays a role in our response too. Read the rest of this entry

KURDISTAN/SYRIA: Anarchists join struggle against ISIS in Kobane

The city of Kobane has been under attack by Daesh (ISIS) fascists for a number of days leading to a mass exodus of Kurds from the city. But many Kurds are now returning to fight and defend the city despite being pushed back at the border by Turkish forces. Inside the border, Kurdish forces along with the Free Syrian Army continue to fight against Daesh.

Turkish and Syrian Kurds tear down the border fence to cross into Kobane in neighboring Syria. Photo:AFP

Turkish and Syrian Kurds tear down the border fence to cross into Kobane in neighboring Syria. Photo:AFP

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